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3 Simple Things People Should Do to Consume Less Energy and Save it For Future Generations

Consume less energy and save it for future generations. We’re always hearing we should, but how?

Here are three simple steps that we can take individually to consume less energy — and if we do that, we save it for future generations… and we are saving money. Take these simple steps and start saving today.

  1. Turn off lights — by far the easiest way to save electricity and save money. Turning off lights as you leave the room alone saves you a lot on your electric bill. Then, as you turn off lights, you see ways to…
  2. Unplug unused electronics — this is the electricity waster that many people do not even know exists. Many of today’s appliances, both large and small, and electronic devices in our homes draw a small amount of power even when switched off. This “phantom power” drain comes from VCRs, televisions, satellite and cable boxes, DVRs, stereos, computers, printers, kitchen appliances, clocks and clock radios, cell phone and portable music player chargers, laptop chargers… almost anything plugged into wall power. This is especially true if the device has a remote control; the circuitry that responds to the remote must ALWAYS be on — and drawing power – or the remote will not work. As much as three quarters of the electricity used to power many of these devices goes through them while switched off.
  3. Switch to energy saving bulbs — by switching to energy saving bulbs technology from traditional incandescent type lamps, you can save energy and save money on your energy bills. Using today’s new energy saving bulbs technologies: Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs), and Light Emitting Diode Lamps (LED or L.E.D.), you can save as much as 80% on the energy you use to light your home — and less energy used is less money out of your pocket plus it reduces the resources needed to create that power.
CFL Bulbs The important thing is always think about ways to consume less energy. Switch off or unplug anything you’re not using. You’ll save a great deal of energy, reduce your utility bill, reduce resources used to create the power, and save it for future generations of people on our planet. Even if you create the power with your own wind and solar generators, if you use less, you will have more for other things — and for future generations.

By Dan Davenport

Dan Davenport wants the world to be a greener place — intelligently. If we use the energy resources we already have wisely, and exploit viable, renewable energy sources, it is good for the planet, we will save money, and, not only we, but future generations, can continue to live comfortably.

Solar Panels May Have Ultimately Arrived At Economic Efficiency

The last example of this specific phenomenon was apparent was in the early 70’s, when there was a crude oil trade embargo and hence, no gasoline. Substitute energies began to pop up here and there with many people jumping on the band wagon.

But, gasoline soon returned in plentiful supplies and unconventional energy sources fell beneath the average consumers radar screen again. Now, in 2017, the common consumer is seeing petrol prices move higher and found a realization that global warming will be affecting finances soon. Substitute energy is back in the sentiments of the ordinary consumer and, maybe, this time for good.

Where did solar go?

Solar power for the home was a big seller during the energy crisis of the 70’s. Many houses found tri-pods of solar panels on their roofs gathering what power they could. These units were found mostly in environmentally sensitive Arizona, but soon they were found across the World. Unfortunately, the solar power cell of the 70’s just wasn’t all that cost-effective and cost quite a bit to put in and maintain. As fossil fuel returned to the marketplace there was diminutive need for solar cells in a time of flagrant consumption. But the idea of solar energy was a good one and many trailblazers understood that it was a good idea that had yet to find its time. Solar panels never went away; they just slid back into the laboratory to await solar panel 2.0.

Solar is back and ready

Today’s solar panel is not your father’s solar panel. Depending upon which type of energy you care to generate, electricity or hot water, today’s solar panel has come a very long way in the form of photovoltaic’s and will go further still. These cells, when combined into panel form, turn the suns rays (so-to-speak) right into power ready for use. They have also become exceedingly efficient, more environmentally sound and less expensive. Today’s solar panel will sit almost anywhere and is quickly finding itself being turned into a panel the thickness of a nano particle. Solar power technology is running at extremely fast pace and driving costs down to an affordable level.

Who’s using the panels?

As mentioned, it takes a change in the purse strings to see a marked change in a consumer’s behavior. With a technology and paradigm shift on the order of solar panels it requires a solid leap forward in panel efficiency, costs of panels , associated elements and an increase in existing costs of fuel. When these factors reach critical mass solar panels start to show up, not at the consumer level, but at the corporate and industrial level. This is simply because business moves its money where the costs-over time-are less. This is just good business. Solar panels are now, as in this past two years, become more cost effective for industry to use then to not use them over time.

Why solar panels now?

Solar panels are now being used primarily because fuel costs are just too high to ignore in favor of a new technology that is worth checking out. Companies have available empty roof space and the choice of trying something on a larger scale to see if it works versus continuing to pay higher fuel bills and environmental costs. The whole concept is extremely self serving. There is no environmental consideration involved. If the company doesn’t use solar panels they have to pay fuel costs and air clean-up expenses along with variable fuel charges. They try out the solar panels and see if they work now. If they do, the company can; commit to a full solar panel program with even more efficient solar panels, significantly reduce fuel costs and almost eliminate air cleaning needs along the way. There is little environmental about it. It’s just good business. After industry gets rolling, solar panel costs will drop like a stone and the consumer will jump on board because…it’s just good business.

The Greenest Ways to Dry Your Clothes

When you’re trying to live a greener lifestyle, it’s helpful to take a closer look at all your daily activities to evaluate their environmental impact. You may be surprised to learn that drying clothes in a standard electric clothes dryer accounts for a whopping 6 percent of the average household’s electricity use. Here is a round-up of ways to use less energy (and save on utility bills!) drying your laundry.

Choose a lower energy dryer. Both gas and electric dryers use electricity to turn the drum which rotates the clothes, but they differ in terms of the energy source that supplies the actual drying heat. Gas dryers are more energy efficient and thus cheaper to operate than most electric models. However, the former come with a higher purchase price plus an additional charge if you need to install a gas hookup to your laundry room. Recently developedelectric dryers with condensers or heat pumps may consume less energy than their more traditional counterparts, which expel moisture via a venting system. Before purchasing a new machine, check labels and compare energy consumption figures.

Set up your dryer in the optimal environment. Your dryer will be able to perform its best if you do not place it in an unheated area, such as a basement. You should ensure that the machine’s location is dry and well ventilated, too. If you have a venting model, vent it to the outdoors.

Keep your dryer clean. Regular cleaning of the lint screen removes dust – a fire hazard – and lowers your machine’s energy consumption by 30 percent. In addition, you will need to scrub the screen monthly to remove film buildup if you use dryer sheets, although you may prefer to switch to greener reusable dryer balls of rubber or felted wool. The vent hose should be cleaned occasionally as well.

Load properly. Use a high speed spin cycle in your washing machine to extract more moisture from your laundry before you even move it into the dryer. Make sure clothes are not bunched up, as this will slow drying time and increase energy consumption. Similar weight items such as lightweight synthetic tablecloths or thick jeans should be loaded together. Try not to run an energy-wasteful partial load, but stay away from overloading, which slows down the machine.

Run efficiently. Whenever possible, dry several loads in a row, progressing from delicates to the heaviest clothes. This way you will benefit from the heat of previous loads. Set the Auto Moisture sensor to automatically turn the dryer off when your clothes are dry. Remove anything that you want to iron while it is still slightly damp.

Use the sun’s power. Drying your laundry on a line outside is the greenest way of all. You don’t need to wait for a summer day; temperature is less important than sunshine and a breeze. Hang the clothes by their edges and spread them out for faster drying. Though it has yet to catch on among the majority of Americans, outdoor clothes drying has many advantages beyond its energy savings. This method is easier on your clothes, causing less wear and tear, shrinkage and static cling. It even kills dust mites, bacteria and fungus, and adds a fresher smell than any fabric softener.

Hang clothes inside if your local climate, HOA or city ordinances restrict you from using the great outdoors. Choose a well ventilated space and open the windows wherever feasible. If you live in a humid state like Florida, try turning on an energy-efficient ceiling fan to help laundry dry faster – even with the fan you will still save on your St. Petersburg electricity bill. Use a freestanding dryer rack or build one permanently into your laundry room; a foldable or wall-mounted rack is very practical.

Killing Energy Star: A Popular Program Lands on the Trump Hit List

It is widely regarded as a success — a voluntary program that has been a win-win for industry, consumers, and energy conservation. So why does the Trump administration want to get rid of Energy Star?

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