Campbell Soup headquarters to add 4.4-MW of solar

Campbell Soup Company, in partnership with BNB Renewable Energy Holdings (BNB), SunPower and ORIX USA  broke ground today on a 4.4-MW solar power project at the company’s world headquarters in Camden, New Jersey.

Scheduled to come online in fall 2017, the system will provide energy to Campbell through a 20-year power purchase agreement and generate more than 5 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year. Upon completion, the solar array will become the largest in the city of Camden.

The project, developed by BNB, will feature SunPower’s innovative rooftop, carport and ground-mount solar solutions, which are designed to optimize power production for commercial customers like Campbell.

At Campbell’s 38-acre world headquarters campus, 2.7 MW will be installed on the rooftops of existing structures and on new solar canopies that will be erected in the parking lots. An additional 1.7 MW will be installed on an adjacent 4.5-acre remediated brownfield that BNB purchased specifically for the project, making use of otherwise unusable land and increasing the capacity of the system.

Under the 20-year PPA, Campbell will buy electricity generated by the solar project at a predetermined rate. The fixed PPA rate, which is currently lower than the cost of traditional electricity for Campbell, provides the company with long-term visibility for this portion of its electricity costs.

The system in Camden will be the third solar project that BNB has developed for Campbell, following the 9.8-MW system at Campbell’s facility in Napoleon, Ohio, and the 10-MW system at Campbell’s Pepperidge Farm bakery in Bloomfield, Conn. Both of those projects also use SunPower’s high-efficiency solar panels.

“We’re excited to partner once again with BNB and SunPower to add a third solar array to Campbell’s U.S. footprint,” said Jim Prunesti, vice president, global engineering, Campbell. “This project contributes clean energy to the local grid and demonstrates to our community the viability of renewable energy sources, all while supporting Campbell’s sustainability strategy to deliver long-term value to our business and neighborhoods.”

BNB and ORIX USA, a diversified financial company with a strong commitment to renewables, will jointly own the project. The term debt is being financed through PSE&G’s Solar Loan Program.

“Bringing a cost-saving solar system to Campbell’s World Headquarters marks a great moment, and we see a bright future for other Fortune 500 companies who follow Campbell’s lead and turn to renewable energy to stabilize energy costs and reap rewards from the sun,” said Matthew Baird, managing partner of BNB. “We are most proud of our collaborative work with Campbell, SunPower, ORIX and PSE&G to make this project a reality.”

The project will also feature five electric vehicle-charging stations, provided by PSE&G via its EV Workplace Charging Program, for use by Campbell employees.

“It’s an honor that Campbell and BNB have chosen SunPower once again as a solar partner for this project,” said Nam Nguyen, SunPower executive vice president. “We look forward to delivering the highest quality experience through our innovative solutions.”

Heroes of Burbo Bank ExtensionThe most powerful wind turbine in the world is now providing clean energy to the UK

Burbo Bank Extension is the world’s first offshore wind park to deploy the V164-8.0 MW turbine from MHI Vestas – the most powerful wind turbine in operation anywhere in the world. This is an inspiring look at a few of the heroes who helped bring Burbo Bank to life #energy #windenergy #windpower #cleanenergy #climate

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The Greenest Ways to Dry Your Clothes

When you’re trying to live a greener lifestyle, it’s helpful to take a closer look at all your daily activities to evaluate their environmental impact. You may be surprised to learn that drying clothes in a standard electric clothes dryer accounts for a whopping 6 percent of the average household’s electricity use. Here is a round-up of ways to use less energy (and save on utility bills!) drying your laundry.

Choose a lower energy dryer. Both gas and electric dryers use electricity to turn the drum which rotates the clothes, but they differ in terms of the energy source that supplies the actual drying heat. Gas dryers are more energy efficient and thus cheaper to operate than most electric models. However, the former come with a higher purchase price plus an additional charge if you need to install a gas hookup to your laundry room. Recently developedelectric dryers with condensers or heat pumps may consume less energy than their more traditional counterparts, which expel moisture via a venting system. Before purchasing a new machine, check labels and compare energy consumption figures.

Set up your dryer in the optimal environment. Your dryer will be able to perform its best if you do not place it in an unheated area, such as a basement. You should ensure that the machine’s location is dry and well ventilated, too. If you have a venting model, vent it to the outdoors.

Keep your dryer clean. Regular cleaning of the lint screen removes dust – a fire hazard – and lowers your machine’s energy consumption by 30 percent. In addition, you will need to scrub the screen monthly to remove film buildup if you use dryer sheets, although you may prefer to switch to greener reusable dryer balls of rubber or felted wool. The vent hose should be cleaned occasionally as well.

Load properly. Use a high speed spin cycle in your washing machine to extract more moisture from your laundry before you even move it into the dryer. Make sure clothes are not bunched up, as this will slow drying time and increase energy consumption. Similar weight items such as lightweight synthetic tablecloths or thick jeans should be loaded together. Try not to run an energy-wasteful partial load, but stay away from overloading, which slows down the machine.

Run efficiently. Whenever possible, dry several loads in a row, progressing from delicates to the heaviest clothes. This way you will benefit from the heat of previous loads. Set the Auto Moisture sensor to automatically turn the dryer off when your clothes are dry. Remove anything that you want to iron while it is still slightly damp.

Use the sun’s power. Drying your laundry on a line outside is the greenest way of all. You don’t need to wait for a summer day; temperature is less important than sunshine and a breeze. Hang the clothes by their edges and spread them out for faster drying. Though it has yet to catch on among the majority of Americans, outdoor clothes drying has many advantages beyond its energy savings. This method is easier on your clothes, causing less wear and tear, shrinkage and static cling. It even kills dust mites, bacteria and fungus, and adds a fresher smell than any fabric softener.

Hang clothes inside if your local climate, HOA or city ordinances restrict you from using the great outdoors. Choose a well ventilated space and open the windows wherever feasible. If you live in a humid state like Florida, try turning on an energy-efficient ceiling fan to help laundry dry faster – even with the fan you will still save on your St. Petersburg electricity bill. Use a freestanding dryer rack or build one permanently into your laundry room; a foldable or wall-mounted rack is very practical.