Tag Archive | building a wind turbine

Why Build A Homemade Wind Turbine?

Using the power of the wind is probably one of the world’s most popular methods of creating renewable energy. It isn’t going to damage the environment because it doesn’t generate any noxious output, it is a renewable energy therefore it won’t run out and it is absolutely free for anybody to harvest.

Progression with hardware and science means that currently, there are dozens, even hundreds of wind turbine generators available today. You are going to have to spend somewhere in the area of $3,000 for a good robust, reliable unit and high electricity generating turbines up to and over $10,000.

It’s not an inexpensive matter having to fork out on ready made turbines, but they are still a fantastic investment that over time will pay for themselves over and over again. However, for the same amount that you would pay for one off the shelf turbine, you could make many homemade wind turbines. For a set of blueprints, you would expect to pay about $50 and the materials ill set you back about $250. You will probably find some of the materials that you need lying around your property and your local hardware store will probably stock the other items that you will need.

Making a homemade wind turbine has never been simpler. You don’t require an engineering disposition or any special understanding, you just require a capacity to read and a modicum of common sense and you will halfway there. Specialist tools and equipment aren’t necessary. Common or garden tools that you have sitting around your shed or garage will be adequate. Some parts of the construction may require the help of a couple of mates. It can be great fun, a family activity as well because it can bring the family closer together and you can discover more about helping to save the environment together.

Because you have the blueprints at your fingertips, you have the capability to build as many homemade wind turbines as you want. One alone won’t generate ample electricity for your property, howeverPsychology Articles, several units should and any superfluous electricity that you generate can be sold back to your energy supply company. The blueprints will also include how to build a solar power system. The power from this can be directed into the same system as your wind power giving you two ways to collect energy. This will ensure that you will very rarely have any power outages.

Countless numbers of property owners have switched over to renewable energy and to the power of the wind and have chosen to build a wind turbine at home to help save the environment and also save money at the same time.

By  Martin Loder

How Do Wind Turbines Work?

One of the fastest-growing sources of energy in the world, wind turbines generate electricity without emitting greenhouse gases into the environment (unlike fossil fuels). These modern-day windmills convert mechanical energy from the wind into electrical power.

Most wind turbines have three main parts: the tower (the long stem that connects to the ground); the blades, which connect to a central hub (the rotor); and the nacelle (a box behind the blades that contains the generator).

While there are several different designs for wind turbines — one of which, the “vertical-axis design,” resembles a giant eggbeater — most of these machines have a “horizontal-axis design,” in which the axis of the blades is horizontal to the ground.

Like a giant pinwheel, the rotor of a wind turbine will spin when triggered by a strong-enough wind. The rotor is attached to a drive shaft, which leads into the nacelle behind the blades and activates a generator. The generator creates electricity, which goes to a transformer that converts it to the right voltage for the electricity grid.

The wind turbines used by utility companies to provide power to a grid are usually placed in groups or rows, called “wind farms,” to take full advantage of windy areas.

 

Author Bio

 Elizabeth Palermo
Elizabeth Palermo
Science who writes about science and technology. She graduated with a B.A. from the George Washington University. Elizabeth has traveled throughout the Americas, studying political systems and indigenous cultures and teaching English to students of all ages.

 

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