Tag Archive | energy saving tips

10 Steps to Save on your Summer Energy Bill

Saving money on our summer energy bill is not only great for the family budget, but is also beneficial to the community. It takes only a few simple steps to cut your energy bill by as much as 20 % -50 %.

Saving energy doesn’t have to be as painful as sunburn, nor does it have to cost much money or time. It has more to do with changing a few energy-wasting habits. And where costs are involved – such as having your cooling system checked annually by a professional – the expense can be offset by making your system more efficient and longer-lasting.

1.)Close draperies or shades during the day to block the sun.

2.)Keep cool air in by installing insulation and weather stripping.

3.)Cook on the grill to keep cooking heat outside. When using the stove, vent heat outside with a range hood.

4.)Use a microwave instead of an oven. Microwaves use less than half the power of a conventional oven and cook food in about one-fourth the time.

5.)Use the air-dry feature on dishwashers.

6.)Service air conditioners annually and change the filter regularly. Use a programmable thermostat to regulate the temperature in your home, and turn air conditioners off when no one is home.

7.)Use cold water rather than hot when doing laundry. You will save about 85 % of the energy it takes to wash clothes.

8.)Use washing machines, dryers, and dishwashers after 7pm when energy costs are lower in most places.

9.)Save energy by using the fast rather than slow spinning cycle when drying clothes, since the fast cycle removes more water.

10.)Switch to fluorescent lights that use on-third of the energy than incandescent lights.

Remember that appliances account for about 20 % of your household’s energy consumption. A new energy-efficient refrigerator could save from $35 to $70 a year compared to models of 15 years ago. This amounts to between $525 and $1,050 during the average 15-year life of the unit.

Remind your family of the steps, and implement them into your life.

Duke Energy’s tips for saving energy this summer

The typical American family spends at least $2,200 on home utility bills each year, according to Duke Energy, and a lot of that cost comes from unnecessary power use.

Although few of us would choose to live without comforts such as air conditioning, heating and electric light, most of us leave these things on at times we don’t need them, like when we’re out of the house.

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6 tips to help you save up to $400 a year in energy cost

These six energy-saving tips are tailored specifically for gas and electric residential customers in hotter climates to help them reduce their energy usage and lower their energy bills. (The savings amounts below are illustrative only. Actual savings … #savingenergy

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Wind Power as a Viable Solution to Meeting Alternative Energy Needs

Although it is much less expensive to initially get hooked into the local electric company’s grid than it is to set up and hook into wind turbines, in the long run one saves money by utilizing the wind for one’s energy needs—while also becoming more independent. Not receiving an electric bill while enjoying the advantages of the modern electrically-driven lifestyle is a wondrous feeling.

Electric bills and fuel bills are rising steadily—but the cost of wind turbine energy is zero, and the cost of installing and hooking up a turbine is steadily coming down as demand rises and more commercial success is realized by various companies producing the turbines and researching technologies to make them ever more efficient. In addition, people are moving away from the traditional electric grids and the fossil fuels for personal reasons including desire for greater independence, the desire to live remotely or rurally without having to “go primitive”, political concerns such as fears of terrorist strikes on oil fields or power grids, or concerns about the environment. Again, this motivation to get away from the traditional energy sources is the same one that causes people to seek the power of the wind for their energy, giving more business opportunities to profit from wind turbine production and maintenance, which drives their costs down for the consumers. In nearly thirty states at the time of this writing, homeowners who remain on the grid but who still choose to use wind energy (or other alternative forms) are eligible for rebates or tax breaks from the state governments that end up paying for as much as 50% of their total “green” energy systems’ costs. In addition, there are 35 states at the time of this writing where these homeowners are allowed to sell their excess energy back to the power company under what are called “net metering laws”. The rates that they are being paid by the local power companies for this energy are standard retail rates—in other words, the homeowners are actually profiting from their own energy production.

Some federal lawmakers are pushing to get the federal government to mandate these tax breaks and other wind power incentives in all 50 states. Japan and Germany already have national incentive programs in place. However, “A lot of this is handled regionally by state law. There wouldn’t really be a role for the federal government,” the Energy Department’s Craig Stevens says. And as might be imagined, there are power companies who feel that it’s unfair that they should have to pay retail rates to private individuals. “We should [only have to] pay you the wholesale rate for … your electricity,” according to Bruce Bowen, Pacific Gas & Electric’s director of regulatory policy. However, the companies seem to be more worried about losing short term profits than about the benefits, especially in the long run, of the increased use of wind turbines or wind farms. Head of the Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies of California V. John White points out, “It’s quality power that strengthens the grid.”