Tag Archive | facts about energy saving

Keep Your Cool This Summer With Energy Efficiency

A ceiling fan can help a room feel up to 10 degrees cooler and uses just 10 percent of the energy of a central air conditioner, so you save money when you don’t have to set your thermostat as low to keep your cool. Make sure your fan is set in the …

 

The Greenest Ways to Dry Your Clothes

When you’re trying to live a greener lifestyle, it’s helpful to take a closer look at all your daily activities to evaluate their environmental impact. You may be surprised to learn that drying clothes in a standard electric clothes dryer accounts for a whopping 6 percent of the average household’s electricity use. Here is a round-up of ways to use less energy (and save on utility bills!) drying your laundry.

Choose a lower energy dryer. Both gas and electric dryers use electricity to turn the drum which rotates the clothes, but they differ in terms of the energy source that supplies the actual drying heat. Gas dryers are more energy efficient and thus cheaper to operate than most electric models. However, the former come with a higher purchase price plus an additional charge if you need to install a gas hookup to your laundry room. Recently developedelectric dryers with condensers or heat pumps may consume less energy than their more traditional counterparts, which expel moisture via a venting system. Before purchasing a new machine, check labels and compare energy consumption figures.

Set up your dryer in the optimal environment. Your dryer will be able to perform its best if you do not place it in an unheated area, such as a basement. You should ensure that the machine’s location is dry and well ventilated, too. If you have a venting model, vent it to the outdoors.

Keep your dryer clean. Regular cleaning of the lint screen removes dust – a fire hazard – and lowers your machine’s energy consumption by 30 percent. In addition, you will need to scrub the screen monthly to remove film buildup if you use dryer sheets, although you may prefer to switch to greener reusable dryer balls of rubber or felted wool. The vent hose should be cleaned occasionally as well.

Load properly. Use a high speed spin cycle in your washing machine to extract more moisture from your laundry before you even move it into the dryer. Make sure clothes are not bunched up, as this will slow drying time and increase energy consumption. Similar weight items such as lightweight synthetic tablecloths or thick jeans should be loaded together. Try not to run an energy-wasteful partial load, but stay away from overloading, which slows down the machine.

Run efficiently. Whenever possible, dry several loads in a row, progressing from delicates to the heaviest clothes. This way you will benefit from the heat of previous loads. Set the Auto Moisture sensor to automatically turn the dryer off when your clothes are dry. Remove anything that you want to iron while it is still slightly damp.

Use the sun’s power. Drying your laundry on a line outside is the greenest way of all. You don’t need to wait for a summer day; temperature is less important than sunshine and a breeze. Hang the clothes by their edges and spread them out for faster drying. Though it has yet to catch on among the majority of Americans, outdoor clothes drying has many advantages beyond its energy savings. This method is easier on your clothes, causing less wear and tear, shrinkage and static cling. It even kills dust mites, bacteria and fungus, and adds a fresher smell than any fabric softener.

Hang clothes inside if your local climate, HOA or city ordinances restrict you from using the great outdoors. Choose a well ventilated space and open the windows wherever feasible. If you live in a humid state like Florida, try turning on an energy-efficient ceiling fan to help laundry dry faster – even with the fan you will still save on your St. Petersburg electricity bill. Use a freestanding dryer rack or build one permanently into your laundry room; a foldable or wall-mounted rack is very practical.

4 Energy Saving Tips You Need to Know

There are a lot of things you can do to save energy every day. Whether you’re looking to conserve energy at home, to help lower your heating bills, or interested in making a big environmental impact, there is a plethora of information available online to get you started.

After reviewing many of the resources available, it’s clear that you can easily get caught up in so much information. To help you sort it out and get you on the fast track to energy savings, we’ve created a list five tips to jump your conservation efforts.

Energy Saving Tip 1

Make sure you turn off all lights and appliances when they aren’t in use. ALWAYS. This is one of the main causes of energy waste and skyrocketing energy bills. Turning off lights and electronic devices both in your home and elsewhere will always help to improve energy conservation.

Energy Saving Tip 2

Turning down the temperature of your home by just one degree can drastically decrease your energy consumption while also helping to lower your home heating bill. You can also consider improving some of your home and window insulation to help you keep the warm air inside during winter and the cool air inside during summer.

Energy Saving Tip 3

If you have the option for choosing lightweight packaging when purchasing products, remember that the less packaging involved typically means there was less energy used to produce it. Making smart decisions is one of the best ways you can help improve energy conservation on a global scale.

Energy Saving Tip 4

Rethinking your travel schedule is another great way to save. Everyone has last minute (and late night) trips to the store, for example, but if you’re able to run 4 errands in one trip instead of spreading them out over multiple trips, you’ll use a lot less gas while saving money.

These energy saving tips are just the tip of the iceberg, but accomplishing even just a few will get you started saving in no time. What do you think are the most important ways to get started saving energy? Leave your ideas in the comments below!
Home energy and conservation expert, resource on propane heating.