Tag Archive | home energy saving

4 Energy Saving Tips You Need to Know

There are a lot of things you can do to save energy every day. Whether you’re looking to conserve energy at home, to help lower your heating bills, or interested in making a big environmental impact, there is a plethora of information available online to get you started.

After reviewing many of the resources available, it’s clear that you can easily get caught up in so much information. To help you sort it out and get you on the fast track to energy savings, we’ve created a list five tips to jump your conservation efforts.

Energy Saving Tip 1

Make sure you turn off all lights and appliances when they aren’t in use. ALWAYS. This is one of the main causes of energy waste and skyrocketing energy bills. Turning off lights and electronic devices both in your home and elsewhere will always help to improve energy conservation.

Energy Saving Tip 2

Turning down the temperature of your home by just one degree can drastically decrease your energy consumption while also helping to lower your home heating bill. You can also consider improving some of your home and window insulation to help you keep the warm air inside during winter and the cool air inside during summer.

Energy Saving Tip 3

If you have the option for choosing lightweight packaging when purchasing products, remember that the less packaging involved typically means there was less energy used to produce it. Making smart decisions is one of the best ways you can help improve energy conservation on a global scale.

Energy Saving Tip 4

Rethinking your travel schedule is another great way to save. Everyone has last minute (and late night) trips to the store, for example, but if you’re able to run 4 errands in one trip instead of spreading them out over multiple trips, you’ll use a lot less gas while saving money.

These energy saving tips are just the tip of the iceberg, but accomplishing even just a few will get you started saving in no time. What do you think are the most important ways to get started saving energy? Leave your ideas in the comments below!
Home energy and conservation expert, resource on propane heating.

Home » Wind Energy Guide » Environmental Concerns

Wind energy development environmental concerns include, noise, visual impacts, and avian and bat mortality.

Although wind power plants have relatively little impact on the environment compared to fossil fuel power plants, concerns have been raised over the noise produced by the rotor blades, visual impacts, and deaths of birds and bats that fly into the rotors (avian/bat mortality). These and other concerns associated with wind energy development are discussed below, and are addressed in the Wind Energy Development Programmatic EIS. To get more information about these concerns and access current research, please visit the suggested web sites listed on the Wind Energy Links page.

Noise

Like all mechanical systems, wind turbines produce some noise when they operate. Most of the turbine noise is masked by the sound of the wind itself, and the turbines run only when the wind blows. In recent years, engineers have made design changes to reduce the noise from wind turbines. Early model turbines are generally noisier than most new and larger models. As wind turbines have become more efficient, more of the wind is converted into rotational torque and less into acoustic noise. Additionally, proper siting and insulating materials can be used to minimize noise impacts.

Visual Impacts

Because they must generally be sited in exposed places, wind turbines are often highly visible; however, being visible is not necessarily the same as being intrusive. Aesthetic issues are by their nature highly subjective. Proper siting decisions can help to avoid any aesthetic impacts to the landscape. One strategy being used to partially offset visual impacts is to site fewer turbines in any one location by using multiple locations and by using today’s larger and more efficient models of wind turbines.

Avian/Bat Mortality

Bird and bat deaths are one of the most controversial biological issues related to wind turbines. The deaths of birds and bats at wind farm sites have raised concerns by fish and wildlife agencies and conservation groups. On the other hand, several large wind facilities have operated for years with only minor impacts on these animals.

To try to address this issue, the wind industry and government agencies have sponsored research into collisions, relevant bird and bat behavior, mitigation measures, and appropriate study design protocols. In addition, project developers are required to collect data through monitoring efforts at existing and proposed wind energy sites. Careful site selection is needed to minimize fatalities and in some cases additional research may be needed to address bird and bat impact issues.

While structures such as smokestacks, lighthouses, tall buildings, and radio and television towers have also been associated with bird and bat kills, bird and bat mortality is a serious concern for the wind industry.

Other Concerns

Unlike most other generation technologies, wind turbines do not use combustion to generate electricity, and hence don’t produce air emissions. The only potentially toxic or hazardous materials are relatively small amounts of lubricating oils and hydraulic and insulating fluids. Therefore, contamination of surface or ground water or soils is highly unlikely. The primary health and safety considerations are related to blade movement and the presence of industrial equipment in areas potentially accessible to the public. An additional concern associated with wind turbines is potential interference with radar and telecommunication facilities. And like all electrical generating facilities, wind generators produce electric and magnetic fields.